Chemical Books

Chemistry for Dummies
John T. Moore

We’re all natural born chemists. Every time we cook, clean, take a shower, drive a car, use a solvent (such as nail polish remover), or perform any of the countless everyday activities that involve complex chemical reactions we’re doing chemistry! So why do so many of us desperately resist learning chemistry when we’re young?

Now there’s a fun, easy way to learn basic chemistry. Whether you’re studying chemistry in school and you’re looking for a little help making sense of what’s being taught in class, or you’re just into learning new things, Chemistry For Dummies gets you rolling with all the basics of matter and energy, atoms and molecules, acids and bases, and much more!

  • Tracks a typical chemistry course, giving you step-by-step lessons you can easily grasp
  • Packed with basic chemistry principles and time-saving tips from chemistry professors
  • Real-world examples provide everyday context for complicated topics
Chemistry Made Easy
NEDU

This book includes over 300 illustrations to help you visualize what is necessary to understand chemistry at it’s core. While Chemistry is a huge topic, it’s not necessary to spend years studying it unless it’s your major in college. For most of us, we need a clear grasp on the subject to progress through school.

You will surely not be a chemistry newbie after reading this. You will learn that chemistry is about matter. You can break matter down a great deal—all the way down to molecules, atoms, and subatomic particles. The smaller the matter, the more fascinating it gets.

Molecules The Elements and the Architecture of Everything
Theodore Gray, Nick Mann

Everything physical is made up of the elements and the infinite variety of molecules they form when they combine with each other. In Molecules, Theodore Gray takes the next step in the grand story that began with the periodic table in his best-selling book, The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe.

Here, he explores through fascinating stories and trademark stunning photography the most interesting, essential, useful, and beautiful of the millions of chemical structures that make up every material in the world.

Gray begins with an explanation of how atoms bond to form molecules and compounds, as well as the difference between organic and inorganic chemistry. He then goes on to explore the vast array of materials molecules can create, including: soaps and solvents; goops and oils; rocks and ores; ropes and fibers; painkillers and dangerous drugs; sweeteners; perfumes and stink bombs; colors and pigments; and controversial compounds including asbestos, CFCs, and thimerosal.

Reactions: The Private Life of Atoms
Peter Atkins

Reactions begins with the chemical formula almost everyone knows–the formula for water, H2O–a molecule with an “almost laughably simple chemical composition.”

But Atkins shows that water is also rather miraculous–it is the only substance whose solid form is less dense than its liquid (hence icefloats in water)–and incredibly central to many chemical reactions, as it is an excellent solvent, being able to dissolve gases and many solids.
Moreover, Atkins tells us that water is actually chemically aggressive, and can react with and destroy the compounds dissolved in it, and he shows us whathappens at the molecular level when water turns to ice–and when it melts.

Moving beyond water, Atkins slowly builds up a toolkit of basic chemical processes, including precipitation (perhaps the simplest of all chemical reactions), combustion, reduction, corrosion, electrolysis, and catalysis.
He then shows how these fundamental tools can be brought together in morecomplex processes such as photosynthesis, radical polymerization, vision, enzyme control, and synthesis.

Organic Chemistry as a Second Language
David Klein

Organic chemistry can be a challenging subject.

Most students view organic chemistry as a subject requiring hours upon hours of memorization.

Author David Klein’s Second Language books prove this is not true—organic chemistry is one continuous story that actually makes sense if you pay attention.

Offering a unique skill-building approach, these market-leading books teach students how to ask the right questions to solve problems, study more efficiently to avoid wasting time, and learn to speak the language of organic chemistry.

Covering the initial half of the course, Organic Chemistry as a Second Language: First Semester Topics reviews critical principles and explains their relevance to the rest of the course.

Each section provides hands-on exercises and step-by-step explanations to help students fully comprehend classroom lectures and textbook content.

The Elements: A visual exploration of every known atom in the universe
Theodore Gray

An eye-opening, original collection of gorgeous, never-before-seen photographic representations of the 118 elements in the periodic table.

The elements are what we, and everything around us, are made of. But how many elements has anyone actually seen in pure, uncombined form? The Elements provides this rare opportunity.

Based on seven years of research and photography, the pictures in this book make up the most complete, and visually arresting, representation available to the naked eye of every atom in the universe.

Organized in order of appearance on the periodic table, each element is represented by a spread that includes a stunning, full-page, full-color photograph that most closely represents it in its purest form. For example, at -183°C, oxygen turns from a colorless gas to a beautiful pale blue liquid.

Also included are fascinating facts, figures, and stories of the elements as well as data on the properties of each, including atomic weight, density, melting and boiling point, valence, electronegativity, and the year and location in which it was discovered.

Reactions: An Illustrated Exploration of Elements, Molecules and Change in the Universe
Theodore Gray

With Reactions Gray once again puts his one-of-a-kind photography and storytelling ability to work demonstrating how molecules interact in ways that are essential to our very existence.

The book begins with a brief recap of elements and molecules and then goes on to explain important concepts the characterize a chemical reaction, including Energy, Entropy, and Time.

It is then organized by type of reaction including chapters such as “Fantastic Reactions and Where to Find Them,” “On the Origin of Light and Color” or “The Boring Chapter”.

Organic Chemistry I for Dummies
Arthur Winter

Organic chemistry has a long-standing reputation as a difficult course.

Organic Chemistry I For Dummies takes a simple approach to the topic, allowing you to grasp concepts at your own pace.

This fun, easy-to-understand guide explains the basic principles of organic chemistry in simple terms, providing insight into the language of organic chemists, the major classes of compounds, and top trouble spots.

You’ll also get the nuts and bolts of tackling organic chemistry problems, from knowing where to start to spotting sneaky tricks that professors like to incorporate.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s